Winter and Spring 2023 Trips

Winter Marine Life at Boulevard Park, Sunday, January 29th

Bellingham Bay is a winter refuge for some of our area’s most iconic and beautiful migratory waterfowl (like the common goldeneye duck at left). The bay is also home to aquatic mammals like harbor seals and otters, and a plethora of marine invertebrates. Join Reconnect Earth to explore the edge of the bay as we follow the trail through Boulevard Park near downtown Bellingham. We’ll stop to look at birds through high-powered binoculars, search for tide pool life on the shoreline, and talk about issues facing the bay ecosystem.

When: Sunday, January 29th, 12:00pm – 2:00pm*

Location: Meet by the Taylor Dock Restrooms off of 10th St (a 25-minute walk or 10-minute bike ride from WWU).

What to bring: A full water bottle and clothing for winter weather.

Difficulty level: Easy, wheelchair accessible.

Register now!

.

Hike to Lost Lake, Sunday, February 26th

One of the most secluded places on Chuckanut Mountain, Lost Lake is accessible via the North Chuckanut Mountain Trailhead just south of Fairhaven. In late February, join us for an approximately 9-mile out-and-back hike to this beautiful spot. Along the way we’ll pause to learn about plants and wildlife we encounter, admire the massive Chuckanut sandstone formations along the trail, and explore our relationship with local ecosystems.

When: Sunday, February 26th, 11:00pm – 5:00pm*

Location: Meet at North Chuckanut Mountain Trailhead (a 10-minute drive or 20-minute bike ride from WWU).

What to bring: A full water bottle, lunch to eat on the trail, sturdy shoes, and clothing for winter weather.

Difficulty level: Moderately challenging.

Register now!

.

Springtime on Lookout Mountain, Saturday, April 15th

April is during the height of spring wildflower season in Northwest Washington, and Lookout Mountain is an ideal place to see forest wildflowers (like the trillium at left) in full bloom. We’ll meet at the Lookout Mountain Trailhead, then follow the approximately 4.5 miles of trail in a loop that will take us to near the top of the mountain where we’ll take in the view of Lake Whatcom below. Be ready to stop to admire and identify plenty of flowers, trees, and other plants and animals along the way! We’ll also have a facilitated discussion about our relationship with wild places near and far.

When: Saturday, April 15th, 11:00am – 3:00pm*

Location: Meet at the Lookout Mountain Preserve Trailhead (a 20-minute drive from WWU, also accessible from downtown via the 512 Bus).

What to bring: Lunch, a full water bottle, and sturdy shoes.

Difficulty level: Moderately challenging.

Register now!

.

Exploring Clayton Beach, Sunday, May 7th

Clayton Beach in Larrabee State Park is one of the best places in Whatcom County to see tide pool life and other small marine creatures that live along the shoreline. After meeting at the South Lost Lake Trailhead parking area, we’ll follow the trail that descends through the woods to the beach, then make our way along the sandy shore, following the water’s edge. Whether it’s colorful anemones clinging to a rock or sand dollars burrowing in the mud, we’re sure to find some remarkable sea creatures. We’ll also pause for a discussion about issues facing marine life and how we can help.

When: Sunday, May 7th, 11:00am – 3:00pm*

Location: Meet at the South Lost Lake Parking Lot (a 15-minute drive from WWU, also accessible by bike via the Interurban Trail).

What to bring: Lunch and a full water bottle. Sturdy shoes recommended.

Difficulty level: Moderate.

Register now!

.

*All end times are approximate. We will do our best to finish up by the time listed on this page, but there is always the possibility of things taking longer than expected and we recommend not making plans that depend on being back by exactly then. Some trips may also finish early.

Reconnect Earth would like to respectfully acknowledge that all our winter and spring trips take place on the traditional, sovereign territory of Indigenous peoples including the Lummi, Nooksack, Samish, Swinomish, and others. We challenge ourselves and others to seek out ways to help rectify past and present-day injustices against Indigenous peoples and work to dismantle systems that perpetuate colonialism.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s